A YOUNG FIST REIGNS OVER THIS CHEFS’ TABLE

Designer-designed interior of The Chefs' Table

Designer-designed interior of The Chefs’ Table

The sophisticated new Umhlanga eatery, The Chefs’ Table, see itself as everyman’s restaurant. It’s not. Thankfully. Because it’s something much more special, writes Ingrid Shevlin 

CHEFS’  TABLE
First Floor, New Tower Protea Hotel, Chartwell Drive,
Umhlanga Rocks
(031) 001 0200
Open daily for lunch, breakfast on Sundays only, and dinner Monday to Saturday.

Soti Sonatas is either a brave or foolish man. Or both. Time will tell.
He’s the hands-on part-owner of  Chefs’ Table, and a man who can boast a wealth of hospitality experience. Think Circus Circus.
Firstly, he’s opened a huge new restaurant ( at least a 140-seater)  in Chartwell Drive, which must have more restaurants per square kilometre than Amsterdam has brothels in their Red Light district (a not too disparate a comparison considering both sell pleasure for money). 

STUDENTS RULE AT QUILLS DELI

Lamb curry, students style

Lamb curry, students style

A heart-warming bangers and mash

A heart-warming bangers and mash

Craft beer brewed in-house, homestyle food, a cheerful vibe and fab views are offered by Quills Deli at the 1000 Hills Chef School. By Ingrid Shevlin

Quills Deli

1000 Hills Chefs School
2 Wootton Ave, Bothas Hill
031 777 1566
Open Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays from 8am to 4pm

You are in for an interesting experience if you elect to visit Quills, a restaurant, deli and micro brewery entirely staffed by students from the 1000 Hills Chefs School. The students both prepare the food and serve customers. It’s perfect training for the real – and harsh – world of hospitality.
Established in 2004 by Chef Dixi (Dixon), its students have since won a slew of national culinary awards. Understandably, since Dixi has a formidable reputation in the hospitality training industry. 

FOOD WITH A VIEW

View from Canelands Beach Club

View from Canelands Beach Club

Ribeye steak

Ribeye steak

Sunday dining on the North Coast in a relaxed environment with wonderful views and good food is seldom this appealing, writes Ingrid Shevlin.  

TWO SHRIMPS RESTAURANT
Canelands Beach Club & Spa
2 Shrimp Lane, Salt Rock
Call 032 525 2300

Canelands Beach Club is a 4-star boutique hotel and spa with stunning views over the sea, barely a stone’s throw away. Contemporary in design, it overlooks a long, infinity-style swimming pool, an indigenous coastal garden, the ocean – and dolphins. A common sight.
The hotel is also home to the newly launched Two Shrimps Restaurant and while London food critic AA Gill firmly stated,  “the better the view, the worse the food”, he’s not right when it comes to the Two Shrimps.
It’s not that their food is without fault, however. But there was more than enough to please the family who lunched there last Sunday, July 17  – and the view and setting were stunning enough to make any pain go away. And we saw dolphins. What a joy.

MARCO NICO: LUCKY NO 13

Marco Nico the activist

Marco Nico the activist

Charcuterie, the art of curing meat. It also includes sausages, pates and terrines.

Charcuterie, the art of curing meat. It also includes sausages, pates and terrines.

Despite vowing never to open another restaurant, Marco Nico is doing just that, reports  Ingrid Shevlin.

Marco Nico is a man of many causes. And they vary wildly from the evils of genetically modified crops and the killing of whales to why Jacob Zuma should go – but not until he’s paid back the taxpayer for the improvements to Nkandla.
He’s an odd blend of reactionary, anarchist and missionary and has the zeal of all three in his attempt to change us and the world we live in – for the better. And he wields his Facebook page as a weapon to fight his myriad causes.
For instance:
He’s anti-GMO
Anti-pesticides in farming
Anti chemicals in processed food
Anti battery farming
Anti big corporations motivated by greed
Anti unnecessary waste.
Anti anything fake
Naturally then, he’s pro organic food, local food producers, foraged food, a low carbon footprint, good animal husbandary, slow food and celebrating the delights of East Coast produce and food.
Many of these beliefs come to together in Thirteen: East Coast Eatery, the new restaurant he’s is opening at 275 Florida road around mid-July. Right now the premises are being revamped, repainted and redecorated. 

LIFE AFTER HARVEY’S

Andrew's Heath Food range

Andrew Draper’s Heath Food range

For the health conscious

For the health conscious

Andrew Draper

Andrew Draper

After he sold Harvey’s Restaurant Andrew Draper took the road less travelled and rewrote his future. It’s called reinventing yourself, writes Ingrid Shevlin.

He opened a fine-dining restaurant at 21, was a culinary legend before the age of 30 after winning a slew of food and wine awards, and reigned over a restaurant which feted the rich and famous – and infamous.
By 43 he had opened and closed several restaurants, one being Harvey’s, which had been operating for almost 20 years  and was still winning awards. He was so popular with his customers he had over 3 200 friends on his personal Facebook page.
But, at 43, Andrew Draper was also at a crossroad, professionally and personally.
Harvey’s was a large 120-seater and times – and restaurants –   were a’changin’ .
It was time to reinvent himself. The first step was to sell Harvey’s Restaurant.
“I thought it would take months to sell, he muses. “But it took only one week”.
But he was fully prepared for a bright, new future without Harvey’s.